Flying Saucer

Lucy has been getting some singalong CDs and there’s one in the car at the minute. One really catchy tune I’ve got in my head is “Five Little Men in a Flying Saucer”. Only 95 seconds long, but very entertaining. It’s been driving my wife crackers.

Five little men in a flying saucer,
Flew round the Earth one day,
They looked left and right,
But they didn’t like the sight,
So one man flew away.

Four little men in a flying saucer,
Flew round the Earth one day,
They looked left and right,
But they didn’t like the sight,
So one man flew away.

Three little men in a flying saucer,
Flew round the Earth one day,
They looked left and right,
But they didn’t like the sight,
So one man flew away.

Two little men in a flying saucer,
Flew round the Earth one day,
They looked left and right,
But they didn’t like the sight,
So one man flew away.

One little man in a flying saucer,
Flew round the Earth one day,
He looked left and right,
But he didn’t like the sight,
So then he flew away.

Plane Sailing

There was a story on the BBC News website recently about a pilot (from Sunderland) who was recalling the recent events where he nearly crashed in the Channel Islands.

Mark Eddlestone’s single-engine aircraft began plummeting at 300ft-a-minute as the crew headed to Jersey.

Plummeting at 300ft-a-minute? There’s nothing plummeting about a descent rate of 300ft/minute. That’s a very gentle downward slope for even the most nervous of passengers.

Don’t forget that once descending at a constant rate, it’s only air pressure which tells you that you’re dropping in height. You can only sense a change in rate of speed (i.e. acceleration), not speed itself. That’s why in a car you can feel hard acceleration yet you’re only doing 30mph, but you can’t feel anything at a constant 70mph.

Plummeting indeed.

Bat!

Cool thing: there’s been a bat zipping round outside our house tonight. There was one lived locally last year and it looks like it (or some descendant) is back. I grabbed my camera and with the aid of my wonderfully-powerful Canon Speedlite 580EX decided to go outside and light up the neighbourhood for a bit.

Now bats flit around in unpredictable patterns at a phenomenal rate, so bearing in mind I was simply hand-holding the camera, with manual metering and manual flash exposure and operating the shutter myself, I was quite pleased to capture it at all. Best I managed was the following image:

Bat

Certainly recognisable as a bat, if not exactly Wildlife on One quality. The photo above is heavily cropped: the original looked like this:

Little bat